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Eve O'Connell3 years ago

Northern Rivers locals, it's time for a cheese-ucation!

Do you enjoy laying out decadent spreads at your cheese and wine nights, but not too sure on where to begin? With so many types of cheese on the market, it can be difficult to make an educated guess on which one is going to be right for you and your guests. If you love cheese as much as we do, then you'll love this cheese list we've put together, along with some info about their ageing, tasting notes and best uses. Let's get right to it, shall we?

Feta

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Originating from Greece and procured from either sheep or goat’s milk, feta cheese varies in texture and taste. Made by soaking freshly pressed curds in salt water and then brined, and ranging from having a very crumbly to creamy texture, feta usually consists of a tangy taste. It is best used crumbled into salads or served with summer fruits.

Monterey Jack

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The perfect cheese for all of your American-inspired dishes, Monterey Jack cheese is very mild and buttery in taste. Perfect for melting, this cheese can be your sandwich or burger’s best friend, or can be enjoyed in fondue form. Being one of the few all-American cheeses, Monterey Jack can make all of your cheesy dreams come true.

Taleggio

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Coming from Italy, this cheese is one of the oldest soft cheeses in the world. Aged for 6 to 10 weeks, Taleggio is easily recognised by its rich, pungent flavour and smell. The grainy texture of Taleggio is acquired during the ageing process, as the rind is repeatedly washed with a salty brine. It’s best enjoyed by itself with crackers.

Gouda

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A popular Netherlands cheese, Gouda can be aged anywhere between 4 weeks to more than a year. Similar to cheddar, its quality ranges from mild and creamy to crumbly with richer flavours. Younger Goudas are best for melting, while older ones taste best grated over salads, or simply by themselves.

Roquefort

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Hailing from France, Roquefort uses sheep’s milk and is usually aged for 5 months. This cheese gets its name from the mould that grows within it, which is also naturally found in the caves of Roquefort, France. Being very moist and crumbly, Roquefort consists of a sharp, sweet and nutty flavour. Eat as is, or serve with nuts and honey to tantalise your tastebuds.

Camembert

Camembert

Another French cheese from the region of Normandy, Camembert tends to be a cheese platter regular. Aged for at least 3 weeks, this buttery cheese has a mild, mushroomy aroma. Mild on the palate and easily spreadable, Camembert is your go-to cheese for cracker toppings, sandwiches or even baked in a crust!


If you’re searching for that finer food experience, let these Northern Rivers cafes take you there.


Palate at the Gallery

Full of warm ambience and natural surroundings, Palate at the Gallery will have your peckish tendencies sorted. Situated next to the Lismore Regional Art Gallery, this cafe’s dedicated team will have your tastebuds thoroughly satisfied. Whether you’re after a tempting red wine and some delicate finger food with your friends, or you want to take the family out for a meal, let Palate at the Gallery’s attentive staff take care of you.
Where: 133 Molesworth St Lismore NSW

Opi’s Coffee House

No matter your reason for dropping by, the friendly staff at Opi’s Coffee House will satisfy any hunger, no matter the size. Drop by for a delicious hot coffee or tea and indulge in some sweet treats, baked fresh daily. With a wide range of vegan and gluten-free options on the menu, Opi’s Coffee House will keep your coffee cravings at bay. Come in and try some local Zentveld’s coffee, or an enticing slice of cake today.
Where: Shop 4/24 Pleasant St Lismore NSW


Check out some of our other dairy lovin’ articles:

 

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